Perhaps it’s the tree-shaded streets and spacious houses that make Carrollton feel nostalgic, or perhaps it is the influence of Tulane and Loyola universities, whose many students, faculty and alumni make the neighborhood feel like a college town. Established as a rural resort community outside of New Orleans in 1833, the neighborhood still has a laid-back feel, and some still refer to it as the “The Historic Town of Carrollton.” It’s also one of the most ethnically and economically diverse parts of New Orleans. Oak Street, one of Carrollton’s main shopping districts, still has the look and feel of the 1950s, while Maple Street offers small stores, numerous coffee shops and a wellestablished independent bookstore in converted Victorian houses. Good restaurants in all price ranges are plentiful in Carrollton including Matt and Naddies, which sits across River Road from the Mississippi and pleasantly rumbles as trains pass along the levee. The only thing Carrollton lacks, residents say, is a convenient supermarket.In 1833 New Orleans Canal and Banking Co. purchased half of the McCarty Plantation to obtain right of way for a planned extension of the New Basin Canal. Investors Laurent Millaudon, Senator John Slidell and Samuel Kohn bought the other half and hired planner Charles Zimpel to create the street grid. Early settlers concentrated on the natural levee, around present day Carrollton, Short, Huso, and Fern streets. By the 1850s, the town had a racetrack, fine gardens, a hotel and an elegant train station. New Orleans family lore often includes stories of the “long” train ride up St. Charles Avenue–sometimes with an overnight stop at Sacred Heart Convent for the Catholic Creoles coming from the French Quarter and beyond to holiday in “The Historic Town of Carrollton.”

Courtesy of the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans

Carrollton

>   About the Area   <

IMPORTANT BUILDINGS

• Carrolton Station
• Camelia Grill
• Sacred Heart Convent

Courtesy of the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans

TIMELINE

1719 Bienville granted lands that include
present-day Carrollton
1723 Bienville divides upriver end of his
grant into smaller tracts for sale as
plantations
1781 Barthelemy McCarty acquires
McCarty Plantation
1803 Louisiana Purchase
1814 Carrollton namesake William Carroll
and 2500 troops camp at McCarty
Plantation en route to Battle of
New Orleans
1816 & Floods through levee crevasses build
1832 up land with silt
1833 New Orleans and Carrollton
Railroad (later the St. Charles Ave.
Streetcar) chartered; begins
operating in 1835
1833 Investors buy McCarty Plantation,
hire Charles Zimpel to map out
streets and lots of Carrollton
1845 Town of Carrollton incorporated
1853 New levee built from Monticello
Avenue to Fern Street
1854 Seat of Jefferson Parish moved to
Carrollton Ave.
1875 New Orleans annexes East Carrollton
1884-85 World’s Industrial and Cotton
Centennial Exhibition in present-day
Audubon Park spurs residential
building farther uptown
1893 St. Charles Ave. Streetcar electrified;
line extended from Riverbend to
present-day Willow St.
1894 City ordinance renames numbered
streets after trees
1988 Carrollton listed on National
Register of Historic Places

Courtesy of the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans

ANNUAL EVENTS

• June: Carrollton Free Street Festival

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